Networks (PLA, PUPiL and PLAN)

PET’s work in research and championing better education opportunities in prisons is greatly enhanced through collaboration. We are proud to be working with other charities, prison staff, education professionals, and the government in a number of networks.

In 2012 PET brought together expert charities, research bodies, universities and businesses to launch the Prisoner Learning Alliance, which now has 23 members.

As of 2016 PET is also developing and serving as the hub for two new networks:

PET is also a member of the following networks:

  • The European Prisons Education Association (EPEA), which is made up of prison educators, administrators, governors, researchers and other professionals who promote and develop education and related activities in prisons throughout Europe. PET Head of Policy, Nina Champion, serves as Regional Representative for the Western Region.
  • The National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance, due to PET’s work funding prisoners to access arts and hobby materials. The Alliance promotes access to arts and creative opportunities as a springboard to positive change for all those who come into contact with the criminal justice system. PET Head of Policy, Nina Champion, serves on the Alliance steering committee.
  • The National Alliance of Sport for the Desistance of Crime (NASDC). PET was invited to sit on the NASDC steering committee following the publication of the report ‘Fit for Release’, which examines the role sports plays in rehabilitation. NASDC is a strategic partnership focused on the use of sport for the prevention of offending and the rehabilitation of offenders. Read more here.
  • The Reducing Reoffending Third Sector Advisory Group (RR3), which aims to build a strong and effective partnership between the voluntary sector, the Ministry of Justice, and the National Offender Management Service to reduce re-offending. PET Chief Executive Rod Clark is a member of the group.
  • The Criminal Justice Alliance, a coalition of over 90 organisations committed to improving the criminal justice system.
  • The Standing Committee for Youth Justice, a membership body campaigning for a more effective youth justice system.